Magnificent Obsession: Wearing My Heart On My Sleeve

I ask my brother why novelty songs get easily stuck in your head even if you don't want them to.

I, being a commuter, think that the PUV drivers who seem to be in mutual agreement to tune their radios to the same station that plays novelty songs have something to do with this.

But my brother simply answers that the reason why these songs replay in your head after listening to them for a couple of times--or even just once is because they use only 3 chords at a maximum. And most of them major chords. Well that's his theory (feel free to rebut it any time.)

With that statement, though, I figure that if all it takes to write a song are 3 major chords, then maybe I could write a song as well. (In this part of writing I hope I am not offending every decent songwriter there is.)

He says what's commonly used are C, D, G and A. So in my song, maybe I could use F, B and E (I say to him with much naïveté.) I still am not familiar with chord progression, but I have time to learn and I shall learn it well. Right now, I'm in love with the sound of F minor and I'm trying to learn its inversions.

It's always been my dream to write songs. Mass hymns in particular.

Someday I hope I could pull off something as passionate as "Magnificent Obsession."

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